A Liberatory Vision

What is your vision of a different world? In this vision, how do you imagine people relating to each other as individuals, as communities? How do you see resources being distributed? How do you envision our daily lives, our workplaces, our families?

The writers of this zine are people who are also asking ourselves these questions. We are involved in struggles for justice in Los Angeles, in New York and in places in between, and we are writing this because we hope the thoughts and experiences we share here will help to spark dialogue about how to build the world we all want.

We offer our vision of a different world, not as a promise of a place that is far off in the distance where one day we hope to dramatically arrive, but rather as a set of principles and values that guide us in our practice of liberation now. We want to talk about how to build movements and organizations that both challenge current conditions and practice liberation. We practice liberation now in order to build experience with holding power differently in our own lives and communities, to reclaim our agency, creativity, humanity, dignity, and our capacity to love and be joyful.

We want to build movements that are capable of interrupting existing systems of oppression, exploitation and domination, and radically shift the ways that we think, relate and live. We understand revolution as a process rather than an event and are working to build movements that transform power, rather than merely seizing or democratizing power in its current forms.

Reflections
Cemscawship
WTF Happened In The 20th Century?!
A Liberatory Vision
What We Value & Envision
South Africa
1871 Paris Commune
DMSC Sex Workers Union Kolkata, India
The Politics & Principles of LA COiL
A Clear Vision Means We Do Our Work Differently
Making an Intersectional Analysis Central
Anti-Colonialism: A ‘Manly’ Fight?
War an Answer For Violence Against Women?
The Limitations of Intersectionality without Unbreakapartable Struggle #metoo
The Limitations of Intersectionality without Unbreakapartable Struggle DREAMERs
My Struggle is Your Struggle
Pedro Lemebel: A Gay Communist from Chile
Garment Workers Center
2001 Economic Collapse in Argentina
Intersectionality in Action
Combahee River Collective
Students Deserve: LAUSD students lead the fight against a racist and classist school system
Orange County Immigrant Youth United (OCIYU)
The Limitations of Intersectionality without Unbreakapartable Struggle
Horizontalism and a New Kind of Leadership
Ella Baker
Non-Hierarchy in Practice
Non-Hierarchy and Power
Zapatistas
Growing Our Work
The Horizontalist Movement We Build Can Build Power
COiL Reflections on Emergent Strategy